Course Schedule - Fall Semester 2024

     

Meeting location information can now be found on student schedules in ESTHER (for students) or on the Course Roster in ESTHER (for faculty and instructors).
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ENGL 359 001 (CRN: 16804)

WRITING NEW ORLEANS —THE CITY

Long Title: WRITING NEW ORLEANS—THE CITY AS MUSE
Department: English
Instructor: Browning, Logan
Meeting: 1:00PM - 1:50PM MWF (26-AUG-2024 - 6-DEC-2024) 
Part of Term: Full Term
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course Type: Seminar
Language of Instruction: Taught in English
Distribution Group: Distribution Group I
Method of Instruction: Face to Face
Credit Hours: 3
Course Syllabus:
Course Materials: Rice Campus Store
 
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Level(s):
Undergraduate Professional
Visiting Undergraduate
Undergraduate
Section Max Enrollment: 20
Section Enrolled: 11
Enrollment data as of: 20-APR-2024 1:42AM
 
Additional Fees: None
 
Final Exam: No Final Exam
 
Description: New Orleans holds an extraordinary attraction for virtually all writers who embrace it as a setting. We will explore that fascination in a wide-ranging sample of writing by such authors as Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, Walker Percy, Eudora Welty, John Kennedy Toole, Michael Ondaatje, Sarah Broom, Maurice Carlos Ruffin, Eric Nguyen, and others. We will try to understand some of the many ways in which these writers have used this mysterious, complex, and magnetic place, striving to explain its survival despite and in some cases because of the social, legal, cultural, and environmental storms that have battered it. Our reading will be balanced between texts long ago admitted to the canon of classic American literature (Streetcar Named Desire, A Confederacy of Dunces) and texts that are part of a recent remarkable outburst of creative energy associated with the post-Katrina city (Ruffin’s short stories; Sarah Broom’s The Yellow House). The food, drink, and music of New Orleans will receive special attention as key parts of the city’s cultural fabric. A final paper will ask you to write your own New Orleans: to build a verbal monument from the foundations of these other attempts to capture the city’s essence in words.
 
Course URL: http://english.rice.edu